“FREE” Business Advertising with Vehicle Lettering

04/20/2009 | Michael Martinelli Jr.

 

What better way to advertise your business for FREE then on your vehicle. Wherever you go your business will be seen. Depending on how and where you drive this could be exposure to 1000’s of people a day that otherwise wouldn’t see it. With a relatively cheap upfront cost for design and installation, everything after that is FREE. One or 2 sales or jobs and it’s paid for. Just think it’s like having a moving billboard with YOUR business logo!

A few things to consider before just diving in:

  • In addition to your phone # and website url you’ll want to list only a few products or services you offer. Don’t put too many as it will be hard to read and crowded. Just list the 5 most important things.
  • Your designer or sign professional should take care of this but make sure there is enough contrast in colors so everything is easily readable. It also needs to be large enough! If you drive a lot at night, consider reflective materials; a little more expensive but well worth the extra cost.
  • Again don’t get too fancy with a lot of text. The logo,a few bullet points, phone # and web url are all you need.
  • A cheaper and less permanent alternative to vinyl lettering is a magnetic sign. While a bit smaller, and having less impact, they do perform the same job. Again, one sale or job and it’s paid for.
  • Don’t settle, make sure you love it!

More Tips:

    • For print, pictures should be at least 300 dpi or at least 2 or 3 mega pixels. Most digital camera these days are at least 5 mp which will be fine for the typical catalog or brochure. For larger printed items such as billboards or posters larger resolution pictures are necessary - 10 mp and above – best left to the professionals.
    • For web, given the right lighting and composition, any digital camera will produce excellent pictures – even a 1 or 2 mega pixel digital camera. Remember though web pictures should still be at least 640x480 in size. I personally like 800x600 pictures but don’t go lower than 640 or so wide. With proper compression, quality is barely lost and file sizes can be kept low enough for dial-up users.
    • Also for the web, make sure thumbnails are actual thumbnails and not just "code resized" full sized pictures. This is bad practice and causes slow load times and not so good looking thumbnails.

 

Personal Note:
After just 10 days, the Bald Guy Designs graphic we put on an employee's car paid for itself with a nice directional driveway sign for a local mechanic’s shop.